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Minimum Wage: Court Orders FG, Labour To Submit Negotiation Report

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Justice Sanusi Kado of the National Industrial Court of Nigeria (NICN) sitting in Abuja has ordered the federal government and the organised labour to submit report of their negotiations in the ongoing dispute over the new national minimum wage on or before 30th January 2019.

Although the Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC) the Trade Union Congress (TUC) and the Nigerian Governors’ Forum (NGF), who are the three defendants in the matter, were not represented in the court when hearing resumed yesterday, the court restated its November 2 order which restrained the organised labour from embarking on the planned strike, and at the same time warned all the parties to the suit against taking any step that could cause disruptions in the case.

Justice Kado had on 2nd November issued an ex parte order to stop the planned nationwide  strike which ought to have commenced on Tuesday November 6.

The federal government, through the office of Attorney-General of the Federation and Minster of Justice,  Abubakar Malami was represented in the court by a legal team led by Mr. Emmanuel Omonowa.

Following the absence of the defence counsels, Omonowa urged the court to restate its order, noting that negotiations on the new national minimum wage was ongoing.

He, therefore, urged the court to give more time to the parties in the suit to enable them to continue with the negotiations and later give a report on the negotiation efforts to the court.

“Pursuant to Order 42(1) of the National Industrial Court Rules, the court should allow parties to see the possibility of amicable settlement of the matter,” Omonowa said.

While restating his 2nd November  order restraining the labour from embarking on the planned strike, Justice Kado warned all the parties to the suit against taking any step that cause disruptions in the case.

He however adjourned the matter to 30th January, 2019, for the parties to report to the court on whether or not they had settled amicably or would still be interested in going on with the case.



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