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How We Spent Abacha’s Loot – FG

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The Federal Government has said it used majority of the funds recovered from the former Head of State, late General Sani Abacha, to pay stipends to beneficiary households of the National Cash Transfer Programme (NCTP).

The Special Adviser to the President on Social Investment, Mrs. Maryam Uwais, disclosed this in Port Harcourt, while speaking at a training workshop training and advocacy for experts on tracing and recovery of illicit funds and assets.

The two-day training workshop was organised by the Human and Environmental Development Agenda (HEDA) in collaboration with the Corner House, Kent Law School and Finance Uncovered with support from MacArthur Foundation and Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

Uwais stated that 35,571 communities that cut across 380 local government areas in 33 states of the federation have been covered for the programme under the National Social Safety-Nets Coordinating Office (NASSCO).

She said: “The popular Abacha loot has been utilized for the payment of N5,000 stipends to beneficiary households.  Our cash transfer continues to ensure that only the poorest in the communities are targeted.

“By September this year, we have over six million individuals that have been registered under the National Social Register. Over 157,000 of those registered are persons with disabilities.

“We have covered 33 states, 380 local government areas, 3,555 wards and 35,571 communties. We have clean data from 33 states but no state has been completed. We are about completing in four years.”

In his good will message, Nick Hildyard of Corner House, United Kingdom, said the fight against corruption will not go anywhere if it does not get full support of the citizens.

In his own goodwill message, Christian Erikson of Finance Uncovered, said it is possible to build a consortium of activists and journalists around the world in order to fight corruption.

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