• The First Martyr For Nigerian Unity

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    A moment before he was shot, on July 29, 1966, Nigeria’s first military head of state Major-General Johnson Thomas Umunnakwe Aguiyi-Ironsi reportedly told his assailants, “Shoot me and you shoot Nigeria.” The goons did not budge. They emptied magazines of Stein guns into his body and that of Col. Adekunle Fajuyi, military governor of Western…

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  • Usman: The NPA Change Challenge

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    Judging by his appointments alone, President Buhari has hardly exuded the “change” slogan of his party, for most government agencies are still manned by members of the old brigade to which he himself belongs. When, therefore, he named a 40-year-old woman, Ms Hadiza Bala Usman, as the new managing director of the Nigerian Ports Authority…

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  • Vain Search For Soldiers Of Fortune

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    Twenty-three years ago, I used to interview Lagos lawyer Femi Falana and report on the activities of activists like him. At times in this column, too, I’ve quoted him because his opinions usually agreed with mine.  We all are activists! Today, however, I must disagree with him and other senior advocates of Nigeria whose recent…

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  • Cross River State governor, Senator Ben Ayade.

    Homeland Security – The Way To Go

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    Cross River State governor Ben Ayade is broaching an idea I’ve encouraged for three years now. He intends to employ 3,000 people to work in the Cross River State Homeland Security Service charged with “providing intelligence, profiling of visitors coming into the state and out of the state, including carrying out services such as neighbourhood…

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  • A Country Of Hungry People

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    When I first wrote about a “stomach revolution” as the real threat to Nigeria, I was simply stating the obvious. A little earlier, I had predicted that famine would descend on most Nigerians soon. Both predictions are now being fulfilled, unfortunately. In almost all radio programmes I’ve listened to, in recent times, callers reiterated that…

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  • The Dead/Dying Children Of Bama

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    Pictures don’t lie. The photos of starving children at the internally displaced persons (IDP) camp at Bama, Borno State, which were taken by a charity, Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF), last week, tell more than a story of wickedness in high places. The MSF (“Doctors Without Borders”) spoke of “a catastrophic humanitarian emergency” at the Bama…

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  • Market Forces At Work

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    It’s a bitter medicine we’ve been forced to take. The Central Bank of Nigeria and many Nigerians (including me) have been uncomfortable with the idea of allowing market forces to determine the exchange rate of the naira. The debate has been going on for at least 30 years – it preceded SAP and other experiments…

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  • Drumbeats Of War In The Niger Delta

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    When I read that former presidents Olusegun Obasanjo and Goodluck Jonathan had travelled to London to meet with President Buhari, in a bid to solve the crisis provoked by the Niger Delta Avengers (NDA), I felt pity for Nigeria. Both former leaders had visited Aso Rock shortly before Buhari travelled to take care of his…

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  • They Murdered Them For Nothing

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    Incidents reported since last Sunday indicate that tempers are flaring up among the poor of northern Nigeria. When people get desperately poor, they become dangerously wicked. Religion is only a smokescreen. It’s the economy, stupid! Thus, at Pandogari, Rafi LGA of Niger State, a young man, Methodus Emmanuel, was murdered by wretched creatures erroneously branded…

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  • One Year Of Buhari

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    Nigeria is unlucky to be led by Muhammadu Buhari at this time, and Buhari is unlucky to have come to office at this time. Had he won in 2003 or 2007, perhaps his government’s policies could have arrested the nation’s economic and moral decline. And the war on corruption and indiscipline would have been an…

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